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The Catcher in The Rye by J. D. Salinger

William Faulkner understood The Catcher in the Rye as this, “His (Holden’s) tragedy was that when he attempted to enter the human race, there was no human race there…. until he either gave up or was himself, by himself, by his own frantic buzzing, destroyed.” This book is a funny one. Not blatantly entertaining...

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The Old Man and The Sea by Ernest Hemingway

“Why did they make birds so delicate and fine as those sea swallows when the ocean can be so cruel?” To read Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and The Sea without remembering its contemplative and thrilling playfulness is difficult. I haven’t read much of Ernest Hemingway besides A Moveable Feast; though, I have all...

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Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

Turning to the multicultural and labyrinthine narrative of Bernardine Evaristo’s Girl, Woman, Other, you’re reminded of the multi-faceted and myriad tendencies of a self. A book that reads like a journal into the lives of 12 women – connected somehow in kinship and affectation – is sketched in a fictively symmetrical format. The first...

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Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

“Did it matter then, she asked herself, did it matter that she must inevitably cease completely; all this must go on without her; did she resent it; or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely?” If somebody told you that an hour is long enough, would you believe it? That,...

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Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges

The stories inside the cocoon of life’s perplexing and re-defining boundaries are never linear. They all inhabit different realities, different mysteries, different creators, and different evils. The point, however, is how they’re told. What if, within those worlds, every dream and its remembrance ignited a chain reaction? Sort of like a tunnel through which...