To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

Reading To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf is like learning how characters blend with each other and their surroundings. And yet the boundaries between their language and inner nature never stay the same.

The book is about the passing of time; stamped by ephemeral moments and endearment. It’s about an unaware, sullen shift; simmered in feeling and an intimate transaction. And the words left unsaid hanging by a thread between two lives.

The story lives longer than its making allows. It’s a beautiful meditation to grasp the brittleness of life. How we argue with it, with the notion of death itself, in a tight coupling of what is permanent and what is now and forever evolving. And that is the fabric of relationships we long for but that never comes to be.

To read it is to surrender to the forceful tide of sorrow’s inevitable current. The ebb and flow of holding on to the shadowed details of life. And how they slip past us as hurriedly as they settle back in.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs: Third Story

Coen Brother’s The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’s third installation “Meal Ticket” is dreary to those who can bear it. It is a spectacle of being too attached to one’s own affliction; as it is a reminder of one’s detached sense of humaneness when putting up against the need to survive. In the “Meal Ticket,” the relationship between the characters played by Liam Neeson and Harry Melling is of a deplorable one.

Harry Melling’s character – who is a dramatic artist with no limbs – is a manifestation of grief and grit. The conflicting qualities present in all of human nature.

And Liam Neeson’s character – traveling the West with an amputee – has a lot in common with a materialist lacking compunction and loyalty. The quality one considers selfish and intolerable.

The story, and as it progresses, gives you the feeling of being too close to the heart. It’s not in how the story materializes. But in how it ends just as well as it possibly can. An unchanging soul living in a changing world. Where you do whatever it takes to make it livable.

“Meal Ticket” is a striking storytelling experience of all loss – which can surpass even itself – in the face of pain and struggle.

Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night feels rushed and, often times, wearisome. It’s a tale about the lives of two people, Dick and Nicole, and how they navigate the currents of their elitist and dramatized world.

It could have been a tragic encounter in the simplest and humane manner. The vibe of the book feels incomplete like a story haphazardly penned down for effect. Being his fourth and final novel, Fitzgerald leaves a lot to the reader’s imagination and grit.
The characters possess inconsequential personalities, it seems, mostly for the protagonist to have some kind of control over them.

Within its own narrative, the book fails on many counts. The stories within are interlaced and not given enough time to seep into the theme of the book. And so, at the end of the book, the feelings are the same as when you read the first page.

Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami’s Men Without Women isn’t easy to talk about. His characters are joined together by the same thread: loneliness. Tales that exist away from the way we understand common life. A telescopic glimpse into the courage of isolation. And the sharp pull of detachment one feels when left astray.

This book is like a path one seldom walks on – not to find oneself but to lose everything – time and distance – to reconnect with solitude and come back to reality.


To buy the book and support this review, buy from this Amazon link.


For The Public Eye is a participant of Amazon Services LLC Associates Program. This affiliate advertising service allows me to receive commissions for the book purchases you make.

Without you having to pay a single rupee more – I just get a certain percentage cut of the price of the book sold on Amazon. Click through this Amazon homepage link to buy more books.

No Name in the Street by James Baldwin

Historical thinking is a result of not one, not two, but multiple perspectives joined together, at its root. This is perhaps easier to understand after reading James Baldwin’s No Name In The Street.

The book highlights all facets of the Civil Rights Movement and America’s particularly engrossing and disturbing account during the 1950’s and 1960’s. It brings to light the helplessness of courage. And the strength humans draw from it.

No Name In The Street is a book that’s quite unlike any other. A book compelling enough to rattle any cage. It takes a stance where everything must be questioned.


To buy the book and support this review, buy from this Amazon link.


For The Public Eye is a participant of Amazon Services LLC Associates Program. This affiliate advertising service allows me to receive commissions for the book purchases you make.

Without you having to pay a single rupee more – I just get a certain percentage cut of the price of the book sold on Amazon. Click through this Amazon homepage link to buy more books.