When Time Isn’t Enough

We consider the flow of time to be infinite – filling a void that runs its course with every generation, every birth, and every death. The physical aspect of time is body seen through the years, growing in size, dexterity, speed, and strength. The readiness of time is anything but ambiguous. However, the flow of time is what humans have harnessed and tried to manipulate, through any medium, to remain obtainable in a sense that answers to our questions. Or in a sense, the way time flows forward is the only answer to our only question: How well do we live?

After watching The Curious Case of Benjamin Button – a film which represents an unusually obvious paradigm of aging and time – a movie which creates a spectrum of the world’s most dreadful trio that is loving an age that exists as a defense against time – forced me to think about perspective.

Perspective as we need it. Perspective as it actually is. Imagine a bird flapping its wings over and over again, wafting in mid-air; not moving in any direction; still yet so topsy-turvy are its movements as if it’s invisibly glued to its place with nowhere to go. A perspective that defies the movement of time in space, but adopts the space as its movement until time catches up with it. Isn’t time but a glass through which we glorify our perspective until it builds itself into an entire millennium? Narrow intervals that mark our thoughts, actions, and beliefs until we move on to another entirely different or inconsequential interval.

If you were to pin down these intervals of time, it would be a room full of stacked boxes; some too big in size, while some too small and almost invisible among the crowd. Some unemptied while some that look like they’ve been destroyed and yet its charred remains still remain scattered on the floor. Or they’re drawers like the ones we have in offices to store documents. Small drawers, rusted with age, stacked on top and next to each other. Our time determines how deep and long each drawer is; each drawer manifests a different scent of a different time.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
At the end of it all, you glimpse into a few boxes or pull out drawers, but the rest remain dormant, almost futile to time. Is that how you perceive time? What happens when you reverse it from finish to start? Then, what will the room in which time marks everything down, so perfectly and so vehemently, look like?

Perspective holds time in its palms. Or is it the other way around? I guess the answer exists beyond what words can explain. Just one of those things we can experience, if in tiny fragments in movies like The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

Are Dysfunctional Relationships The New Normal?

It’s difficult to label this movie as something that provokes an easy laugh. Rather it is the kind of movie that forces you to have a peculiar or uncharacteristic reaction that’s completely unnecessary, to begin with. And this aspect is the whole and sole of why Margot At The Wedding caught me off guard.

Beside the point, I specifically chose to write about the illuminating reality of conversations that bind the idiosyncrasies of two people in a kind of relationship that defines nothing but eccentric consequences. The characters walk in zig-zag lines to not only observe but shackle the bond of beauty itself into something self-serving and conceited. In short, you’ll find yourself bound to misery in its fullest dimensions. That is precisely what a dysfunctional relationship ought to explore as a deeply exhaustive yet thoughtful concept. Perhaps becoming unaffected to a point where showing little to no concern in matters besides yourself is the greatest normalcy of life, as we know it.

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The clever insanity and indifference portrayed is not shocking, but seems too real to be true. The kind of dispassion each character provokes in another through brutal honesty and constant justification humiliates the conventional families that are often plotted on-screen.

This same logic applies to Noah Baumbach’s The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected).

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I loved the unorthodox display of unanswered affection and unresolvable temperaments of each character. At this point, I feel a part of me exists as all the characters in the movie, including Malcolm, Ingrid, Jim, and Pauline. Margot and Claude taking the leading positions in my frame of mind.

In whichever way the concept of “family” is portrayed in this movie, it certainly sticks, in my way of thinking, as the epitome of perceiving the out-of-the-ordinary as completely familiar and relatable. There’s more than just seeing, but feeling the characters unravel in front of your eyes in-between the socially awkward, yet seductive, language of storytelling. And that’s one of the expert functions of good films like Noah Baumbach’s Margot At The Wedding and The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected). Both exquisite tools of knowing how often people wish to be confronted by their harsh and unwavering realities, within their own limits, regardless of how much or how little they care for it.

The Scrutiny of Restricted Worldliness

Leo Tolstoy wrote in his beautiful work War and Peace, “Everything depends on upbringing.”

The Scrutiny of Unrestricted Worldliness- black mirror

A child’s personal identity, biologically and physiologically, unique and gentle – the years that create long and inevitable passages of perspective – are found and lost right from the start. It is a part of a metaphorical maze, that a child shouldn’t meander alone. The discipline of unraveling diverse and visceral cultures – that which also includes threads of languages and chronicle of events – is more important to be felt by a child rather than learned. This sparks imagination as much as it does temperament. But how soon is “the right time” to impact a child’s inner nature with stimulus resistive and nullifying, while also being realistic?

This question is deeply exemplified and astutely apparent in Black Mirror’s Arkangel, which is the second episode of the latest fourth season. The ability to blur out graphics that might elevate Sara’s cortisol levels, like in the episode it was the neighbor dog who barked incessantly whenever Sara walked past, sheds light on the general idea of parenting in this world. Anything that is considered, by the society, of course, a potential danger or stress-inducing experience to the community increases a sense of fear, anxiety, and mental and bodily distraction in children. A few examples pointed out in this episode were the suffering and finally death of a grandparent, porn, blood, or violence. Anything that stunts emotional growth, or at least is believed to, leads to the disorientation of the thing that constituted that kind of restrictive technology itself.

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This begs you to answer a question – what you do the same for your child if you had the resources to? Such kind of restrictive worldliness has its own consequences. The upbringing based on exposing a child to only good things and avoiding and unwaveringly pushing away the bad stuff disrupts the wholeness of a child’s identity.

This reminds me of a powerful passage which extracts the importance of negativity and teaching the perspective of it in Eckhart Tolle’s The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment, “If you get the inside right, the outside will fall into place. Primary reality is within; secondary reality without.”

But just as negativity impacts a child’s emotional and mental cognitive capacity, the complex intricacies of the mind and the core human tendency are deeply impacted, and not in a positive way, without the very things that arouse negative feelings such as guilt, regret, tension, worry, and all forms of psychological distresses. In experiencing the present moment, as real and unrestricted as it may be, in either speech, thought, or observation builds a sense of present-moment awareness. This is significant, I strongly believe, in the acceptance and non-acceptance of what is. As it habitually alters a child’s inwardness toward all aspects of life, it also contributes to the child’s narrative which, unconsciously, constructs what makes each human unique.

Even though experiences, when analyzed, hold together a set of emotions in each of us, the reasoning, sense, and readiness are still left unhindered. The ease with which a child navigates the unmitigated realities of existing between choices and people is what matters. And the kind of environment parents, siblings, and relatives bring into existence for a young soul remains the serious and most important quest for parenthood.

Why I Look Forward To Hidden Figures

Gaining incredible spotlight, if you’re up-to-date on the reading, Hidden Figures is one of those upcoming movies that speak of an untold story from history about the great and prominent achievements that were found in making an auspicious change in the lifestyle of many. Not to my surprise, Hidden Figures is also an upcoming book that tells a remarkable story of a group of female scientists who were significant behind the biggest and most influential advances in aeronautics, in the 1940s era. What this movie tells is the proud story of a solid team of African-American women who aid NASA by providing them with crucial mathematical data in the context of making a startling change for so many black women who enjoyed their long careers within the community. According to a recent article published on The Guardian, it was pointed out in the book that just 2% of black women got a university degree and more than half became teachers. And only a few broke down their “chosen” paths to join NASA to become serious mathematicians.

According to Hidden Figures website, hundreds of women worked as “human computers” for the NACA, former NASA, from the 1930s through the 1980s. This website encourages The Human Computer Project that strives and has accomplished great to recover hundreds of names and legacy for all female scientists, data analysts, mathematicians, and engineers who worked at NASA during that time. It is a solid effort to bring to light what has been forgotten, or not given enough importance today.

Hidden Figures highlights the lives of those black women who paved the way, being steadfast and true to the end, during one of the biggest advances in aeronautics, and other influential moments that made the 20th century what it stands for today. Katherine Johnson, is an African-American physicist, space scientist, and mathematician, born in 1918. She’s been a part of many major space programs that also took a giant leap during the moon landing, a fact that remains unknown, until now. She wasn’t alone. There was a proud team of all-female and all-black scientists behind every major space programs during that time. That’s what Hidden Figures is built to portray so contemptuously and with such single-hearted commitment. And that’s why I am looking forward to this movie releasing in 2017. I will, most probably, read the book first, like I always do, but I might hold off a bit more just to read it at the right time when this movie releases so the spirit instilled in their story and their hard work is still alive when I sit with cheese and salted popcorn with a Red Bull can, to watch it passionately in the cinema.

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I didn’t choose to write about this movie, specifically, because it speaks of the unforgotten and untold story of black NASA women. I chose this movie because this is the perfect kind of a movie that the world must watch right now. It’s empowering and it keeps us reminded of the marvels that have happened in the past that have shaped our present and future. Things are rapidly transforming from one generation to the next, but what stays are such brilliant biographical films about strong, intelligent, and beautiful people in the world. It inspires us to do more, be more, and give back more. Because what’s knowledge when it’s not passed on to others?

Coming from a time when African American women were barred from studying in colleges, they were unable to be literate, forget about being educated. They were kept from being confident enough to tell their own story. And this destitution had been passed on from generation to generation until women like Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and countless more who fought for their right and place in the world. These were the women who never stopped striving, to find a way to face their own lifestyle choices in a way that it meant to go against whatever bias came their way. How can such a movie that reflects such brilliant principles not be interesting and inspiring for anyone?

Such movies boast of great sense and capability, at work and in a person’s personal life. When applied to making a change, being a woman who’s looked at as something meant to fulfill an already-decided duty, this untold and true story is heartening and conversable for all. That’s why I chose to write about Hidden Figures.

Starring Taraji Henson as Katherine, Octavia Spencer as Dorothy, and Janelle Monae as Mary Jackson, this movie is set to release in January 2017.

You can watch the trailer here and know more about the upcoming movie and book here.

Changeling: The Times in 1928

Changeling, based on true events, is one of the most provocative movies liberated on-screen. The movie begins as a story of a single mother, bound by her lonesome life, caring for her little boy and providing for her home. There is no defined direction to this movie as the story becomes more than just about the mother and her missing child: it transforms into a tragedy of struggle, and frustration.

There is a war between the powerful and powerless that’s taking course in the movie. To watch this movie is to live forever in the dark. I couldn’t understand the why, but I was looking for the where. This movie conveys fortunate when unfortunate is all it’s got. It represents life when death is all around. It gives hope when disappointment is all that’s felt. And I feel miserable when I wish I had something less miserable to focus on. Changeling is based on a true story and it’s heartbreaking as it is courageous. It is frustrating as it is foreseeable. The impact of the press was given much importance in the script of the movie, as it was years ago in reality. To read was to believe. That was the wave of influence that newspapers had on their readers.changeline-2
Even though the scenes in the movie were easy to grasp, there was something missing that needed to be found. This movie confused me into believing the hard truth but only for something that is so easy to understand. The characters played in this movie are justified and their motives plausible. The way each person is carefully given personality makes Changeling well illustrated. There is no time-killing pointlessness in the movie and the story felt as real as it could be. The expectations that were dictated by the plot seemed well-defined by the actors, especially Jason Harner (as Gordon), who’s acting was completely crazy and up-to-the-par of the movie. As much as I love Angeline Jolie (as Christine) and John Malkovich (as Reverend Gustav), they both completely surpassed their designated scripts as opposing to the way this movie was made out to be seen. The actors fit well with the kind of cinematography the director wanted to accomplish.
The way Changeling was staged, with women given utmost fashion and cultural responsibility, while men given more of a formal responsibility made me feel like this movie knows what it’s up against: an era at the cusp of an evolution. The story was made out to be very queer and hysterical- emotionally and foreseeable- fundamentally.
Changeling is not changed but the growth of mentality. I wished that silent struggle would come to an end, but it never did. Changeling is the fight between love and hope; between what is lost and why. Changeling characterizes misery the way ice melts and fire burns; it’s inevitable. I’ve lived in this movie and after it. And in the end, the light in the darkness was the darkness itself.
Changeling changed the change by justifying truth when lie was all they’d got. It showed the sufferings are not felt, they’re understood and that is what makes the soul go mad.

Review On HSBCs Campaign -Lift- from Grey London

This day and age, the idea of establishing and growing a business has inspired people through marketing tools such as articles, infographics, podcasts and videos. Since the heroics of the internet, people have adopted new and creative ways to encourage almost everyone to stand up and make a point in their lives to change, grow and learn.

Enlivening the spirit of entrepreneurship has and will be ignited in many still but the act of encouraging professionalism and relationships between those who you work with, can only be fired up  by advertisements. And we, human to human, lead such expeditions and gain so much without even realizing the importance of it.

This is how HSBC’s campaign, Lift, has become one of the most striking advertisements this year.

There was portrayal of anticipation in the introduction bit of the video, when the founder of Cadours Industries, walked in his new corporate building to attend to the lift to reach upon his office, on the sixth floor.  That take was the perfect giveaway of how new business startups emerge from the bottom-most floor to the paramount canvas of the building; from close quarters and cabins and a few employers to a much more defined organization; and how each level is as significant as the next and as symbiotic as the last. Then comes the most interesting and creative part of the video, the LIFT, which was aptly conveyed through the actors’ postures, attitude, fashion, make-up and their expressions. It felt as if that man’s entire business life, from being a fresh businessman to the cusp of his successfulness towards the end, was drafted in that lift with those people with whom his relationship was attached to. And along with that commotion, there was the destination deliverance from the sixth floor of the building to the forty sixth floor, when last seen, was absolutely marketed with deft and accuracy.

There is no dialogue or narration scripted in this movie and so the direction of it is aimed at almost every precise emotion that was present in that box. This style of narration is almost left incomplete in the sense of its sheer marketing, but, from the minim note of storytelling: it’s a hit!

HSBC – Lift from Grey London on Vimeo.

This post originally published on CrazeCommerce’s Blog page