Thumbnail Placeholder

Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel

Don’t we all, in our inner minds, look at things strangely? That when you really minimize the noise, the pointless chatter, and get straight to the point, human life and living is absurd. This is how I saw The Grand Budapest Hotel. Wes Anderson’s characteristic and dark and funny film. There’s humor in silence,...

Thumbnail Placeholder

Giuseppe Tornatore’s Cinema Paradiso

This film is like a cloud that hovers above you, comforts you, makes you laugh, and then as it passes over, you’re covered in sadness and nostalgia. Cinema Paradiso is one of those sensitive, sentimental, and unyielding films that you feel more than you can see. That’s not to say it isn’t visually charming....

Thumbnail Placeholder

Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers

The portal to desire is often through self-expression. Both, discovered and spent in the same breath, are often interlaced. We can’t know what desire is and yearn for it if we don’t know how to unrestrainedly express ourselves. And when that happens, does it matter who we express ourselves to? That self that one...

Thumbnail Placeholder

Joshua Safdie & Benny Safdie’s Good Time

You can subject people to much unease and anticipation with color. It doesn’t matter how you want to see it. You see what’s there – and it’s gritty, uncomfortable, and hypnotizing. Good Time, starring Benny Safdie and Robert Pattinson, is a picturesque film. It’s about Connie’s (Robert Pattinson) desperate and conflicted and bizarre journey,...

Thumbnail Placeholder

Isao Takahata’s Grave of the Fireflies

You need to trust an animated film. It possesses a childlike nature; the fabric of which is unfeigned and vulnerable. We don’t live life in such vivid and beaming colors. Assimilating landscapes that are bold enough to capture the vestibules of our mind. Our imagination is mimicked (perhaps even limited) by own perceptibility. And...