The Fountainhead – Ayn Rand

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand is the sanest book about the insanity of nothingness. And what humans are capable of accomplishing to fight against it. Isn’t the absence of a thing that gives rise to nothing? And the power the emptiness holds over everything else.

Humans think because they have been given a choice not to. They act because there’s the absence of an action lurking in the corner as their shadow; forming their identities. This act, and the emptiness of its realization is what’s personified in the book.

Air has a pattern we don’t quite know how to keep track of. And that it gives definition to everything else. So tell me – which is more powerful? The one wielding the rock or the space that allows one to do so? Are we powerful because we can quantify courage, wisdom, and greatness – magnifying it as we see fit – and praising our own capacity while doing so? The significance is in the space. Handed over to the action. Given the freedom to do so. Freedom, then, is not taken to measure one’s survival. It’s perfectly granted.

So if we are capable of transcending power in some such way. Where the air is heavier than the thing that takes its place. What is left to prove?


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